Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Even a Little Light in Your Bedroom Could Harm HealthWant Respect at Work? Ditch the EmojisAs Clocks Spring Forward, Keep Sleep on TrackSleep Experts Call for End to Twice-a-Year Time ChangesHigh Anxiety: Poll Finds Americans Stressed by Inflation, WarAHA News: Ready to 'Spring Forward'? Ease Into the Time Change With These 9 Health TipsSome Americans Gained Better Habits During Pandemic, Poll FindsStressed Out by Ukraine News? Experts Offer Coping TipsBegin Now to Protect Your Heart as Clocks 'Spring Forward'Apps: They Help Manage Health Conditions, But Few Use Them, Poll FindsLifestyle Factors Key to Keeping Good Vision With AgeExercise Helps You Sleep, But Which Workout Is Best?Fitbit Recalls Over 1 Million Smartwatches Due to Burn HazardAHA News: Understanding 'Black Fatigue' – And How to Overcome ItPandemic Didn't Dent Americans' Optimism, Polls FindHuman Brain Doesn't Slow Down Until After 60AHA News: Does Kindness Equal Happiness and Health?Apps Can Help Keep Older Folks Healthy — But Most Don't Use ThemAHA News: Want a Healthier Valentine's Day? More Hugs and KissesStudy Hints That Cutting Daily Calories Could Extend Healthy Life SpanHow Healthy Is Your State? New Federal Data Ranks EachMidwinter Blues Could Be SAD: An Expert Guide to TreatmentsSpice Up Your Meal to Avoid More SaltSearching for Good Sleep? Here's What You're Doing Right - and WrongPandemic Worsening Americans' Already Terrible Sleep, Poll Finds​AHA News: Fine-Tune Your Health With These 5 Music IdeasAHA News: Healthy Living Could Offset Genetics and Add Years Free of Heart DiseaseCould Everyday Plastics Help Make You Fat?Take These Winter Workout Tips to HeartStay Safe When Winter Storms Cut Your PowerAHA News: Sound the Fiber Alarm! Most of Us Need More of It in Our DietExtra 10 Minutes of Daily Activity Could Save 110,000 U.S. Lives AnnuallyWinter Blues? It Could Be SADOrdering Groceries Online? Good Luck Finding Nutrition InfoBinge-Watching Could Raise Your Blood Clot RiskDon't Snow Shovel Your Way to a Heart AttackCelebrities' Social Media Promotes Junk Food, Often for FreeZoom Meeting Anxiety Doesn't Strike EveryoneDid Adding Calorie Counts to Restaurant Menus Make Meals Healthier?AHA News: Here's to a Fresh Start With Whatever You Do in '22Do You Have 'COVID-somnia'? These Sleep Tips Might HelpMake 2022 Your Year for a Free Memory ScreeningNew Year's Resolution? Here's How to Make it Stick12 Steps to the Best Holiday Gift: HealthAmericans Turning to Trendy Diets to Shed Pandemic PoundsAHA News: Can the Cold Really Make You Sick?Unsung Heroes of the Pandemic: DogsHolidays Are Peak Time for Heart Attack: Protect YourselfAHA News: The Pandemic Made It Hard to Stay Connected. Here's How to Reestablish Healthy Relationships.Omicron Latest Mental Blow to Americans Exhausted by Pandemic
Links
Related Topics

Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management
Weight Loss

Want That Healthy Skin Glow? These Foods Can Get You There


HealthDay News
Updated: Aug 21st 2021

new article illustration

SATURDAY, Aug. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Eating foods high in five key nutrients can help you have soft, glowing, healthy skin, an expert says.

Omega-3s: While they're typically associated with brain and heart health and lower blood pressure, they also "can reduce inflammation and keep your skin moisturized," clinical dietitian Margaret Ifarraguerri, of LifeBridge Health's Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, said in a Lifebridge news release.

Omega 3s are found in fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna, herring and sardines and also in flaxseed, chia seeds and walnuts.

Vitamin C: The body needs vitamin C to produce collagen, a protein that helps heal wounds, and it's essential for skin cell production, Ifarraguerri said.

Some of the best sources of vitamin C are citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruit as well as tomatoes, berries, bell peppers and kiwi fruit.

Vitamin A: This antioxidant "is essential in promoting skin cell growth" and can help protect the skin from ultraviolet (UV) damage, especially during spring and summer when the sun's UV rays are most intense.

You'll find good amounts of vitamin A in green, leafy vegetables (including broccoli), carrots, sweet potatoes and squash.

Vitamin E: This vitamin also acts as an antioxidant and can protect against UV damage. Vitamin E deficiency has also been linked with dry skin.

Foods rich in vitamin E include almonds, hazelnuts and peanut butter. Vegetable oils, including safflower, sunflower and wheat germ oils, are other good sources.

Zinc: This mineral "is an essential nutrient for wound healing" and keeping the skin healthy, according to Ifarraguerri.

Baked beans, pork and beef are among good food sources of zinc, and oysters have more zinc per serving than any other food.

Most of your nutrients should come from food and beverages, nutrition experts say. Ask your doctor and dietitian about your specific nutritional needs and how best to address them, Ifarraguerri advised.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more on skin care.


SOURCE: Lifebridge Health, news release, Aug. 12, 2021




328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville,
Alabama 36460
Tel: (251)575-4203
Fax:(251)575-9459


powered by centersite dot net