Women's Health
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black WomenBetter Access to Birth Control Boosts School Graduation RatesA Vitamin Could Be Key to Women's Pain After Knee ReplacementFreezing Tumors Could Be New Treatment for Low-Risk Breast CancersGiving Birth During the Pandemic? Facts You Need to KnowDo Your Genes Set You Up for Hot Flashes?Common Complication of Pregnancy Tied to Higher Stroke Risk LaterMigraine Before Menopause Could Be Linked to High Blood Pressure LaterA Woman's Weight Might Affect Her Odds for MiscarriageBreast Cancer Over 70: How Much Treatment Is Enough?Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher RatesUrinary Incontinence Surgery Won't Raise a Woman's Cancer RiskOvarian Cancer Diagnosis Can Take Big Toll on Women's Mental HealthWomen More Prone to Concussion's Long-Term Harms: StudyMammogram Rates Have Rebounded Since Pandemic Began, But Concerns RemainHeart Disease Gaining on Cancer as Leading Cause of Death in Young WomenWhat Is Endometriosis, and How Is It Treated?OCD May Be More Common in New Moms Than ThoughtEven a Little Coffee in Pregnancy Could Impact Newborn's Weight: StudyDrug Boosts Survival for Women With Advanced Ovarian CancerPostpartum Bleeding Doesn't Have to Mean Hysterectomy, Experts SayPandemic Has Pregnant Women 'Really Stressed,' Survey ShowsMany U.S. Mammography Centers Aren't Following Expert Guidelines: ReportBlack Women More Prone to Postmenopausal Weight Gain Than White WomenMost Women Can Give Birth Naturally Even When Water Breaks Early: StudyCommon Household Chemicals Tied to Preemie BirthsLockdowns Tougher on Women, and Housework Is Big Reason WhyTHC From Pot Lingers in Breast Milk for Weeks: StudyBreastfeeding Moms Get Mixed Messages When Baby Has an AllergyHigh Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Is Linked to Shorter Life Spans for WomenDevice Used for Thousands of Years Eases Major Cause of Female Urinary ProblemsLots of Belly Fat at Menopause Could Boost Heart RisksA Vaccine Against UTIs? New Mouse Study Brings Shot CloserWomen With Type 1 Diabetes May Have Fewer Childbearing Years: StudyMany Women Getting Wrong Antibiotics to Treat a UTI: StudyHigh Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Could Affect Women's Hearts Long TermSwitch to Plant-Based Diet Could Protect Older Women's Brains3D Mammograms Best at Spotting Tumors, But Many Black Women Missing OutNew Drug Combo Could Be Advance Against Uterine FibroidsUrinary Incontinence a Common Issue for Older Women, But Treatments Can HelpMore Young U.S. Women Are Dying From Heart DiseaseIs Any Amount of Coffee Safe for Baby During Pregnancy?COVID Vaccine Reaction Can Mimic Breast Cancer Symptoms, But Doctors Say 'Don't Panic'Prescription Opioids, Antibiotics in Pregnancy Won't Raise Birth Defect Risk: StudiesAHA News: Why Black Women Are Less Likely to Survive Pregnancy, and What's Being Done About ItAfter Long Decline, Breast Cancers in Young U.S. Women Are On the RiseDiabetes While Pregnant Ups Odds for Heart Disease LaterMS Doesn't Put Women at Higher Risk During PregnancyAHA News: Hormones Are Key in Brain Health Differences Between Men and WomenType 2 Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Help Prevent Some Breast Cancers
LinksSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development
Mental Disorders

Giving Birth During the Pandemic? Facts You Need to Know

HealthDay News
by Robert Preidt
Updated: May 4th 2021

new article illustration

TUESDAY, May 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Giving birth during the coronavirus pandemic presents its own challenges, but the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) wants to reassure pregnant women that they need not panic.

Instead, they "should be comforted to know that the hospital is a very safe place to have a baby now," said Dr. Beverly Philip, president of the ASA.

"The obstetricians, midwives, physician anesthesiologists, nurses and other health care providers who care for women in labor have been vaccinated and follow other precautions to ensure safety, such as wearing personal protective equipment," Philip explained in a society news release.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says COVID-19 vaccination is safe and recommended for pregnant women. Vaccination protects both mother and baby. Talk to your health care provider about whether the vaccine is right for you, the ASA advises.

All patients admitted to a hospital, regardless of vaccine status, are tested for COVID-19, including mothers in labor. If you're scheduled for a cesarean delivery, you'll be tested two to three days in advance. Your labor support partner/person will also be screened.

If you test positive, your health providers will wear extra protective equipment, and physician anesthesiologists — experts in airway control and critical care — will be closely involved in your care because COVID-19 can cause breathing issues.

Because women in labor usually breathe heavily during contractions, you'll have to wear a mask when your health care providers are in the room with you, as will anyone who accompanies you for support.

Currently, most hospitals permit only one or two support people in the room with a woman in labor. If you test positive for COVID-19, you will not be able to bring any support people in the room with you. But health providers can help with breathing and other support during labor, and possibly arrange a live video chat with your support person.

After delivery, most new mothers leave the hospital sooner than before the pandemic: One day (versus two days) after a vaginal birth, and two or three days (versus three or four) after a cesarean delivery. You can expect health providers to follow-up with you after your release to monitor your pain and answer questions, according to the ASA.

Telemedicine can help women with high-risk pregnancies be seen regularly before they are in labor, and also connect new mothers with their health providers, the experts noted.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on COVID-19 and pregnant women.

SOURCE: American Society of Anesthesiologists, news release, April 29, 2021




328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville,
Alabama 36460
Tel: (251)575-4203
Fax:(251)575-9459


powered by centersite dot net