Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Asymptomatic Kids With COVID-19 May Also Carry Less VirusLockdowns Can Widen Kids' Waistlines – Here's How to Curb ThatSocial Media 'Kid Influencers' Are Promoting Junk FoodsPoverty Might Raise Black Kids' Health Risks as Early as Age 5It's Tough to Change the Minds of 'Vaccine-Hesitant' Parents, Study FindsStudy Probes Links in Asthma, Food Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel SyndromeYour Guide to a Safe and Happy HalloweenKids' Hospitalizations Accompany Rising Unemployment Rates: StudyMusic Classes Strike a Chord in Kids' Brain Development: StudyPediatricians' Group Tackles Racism in Health CarePandemic Silver Lining: Steep Drop in Kids' FracturesPlan Ahead to Keep Halloween Safe for Kids With Asthma, AllergiesEarly School Sports Reduce ADHD Symptoms Years Later for GirlsDo Minority Kids Face More Danger During Surgeries?1 in 3 U.S. Parents Won't Get Flu Shots for Their Kids: SurveyKids Much Less Prone to Coronavirus Infection Than Adults: StudyImmune System Clues to Why COVID Is Easier on KidsFDA Warns of Danger From 'Benadryl Challenge,' Asks TikTok to Remove VideosAfter COVID-19 Exposure, When Can Young Athletes Resume Play?Kids Who Need Steroids Face Risk of Diabetes, Other IllsMom-to-Be's Pot Use Linked With Higher Odds for Kids' Mental WoesKids Often Hit Hard by Death of Beloved Pet, Study FindsHolidays Can Be a Fright for Kids With Food AllergiesHow to Help Ensure Your Students Get Enough SleepAs Schools Reopen, Many Students, Staff Live With High-Risk Family MemberBlack Kids at Higher Odds for ADHDProbiotic Might Help Ease Children's EczemaMore Than 1 in 3 U.S. Pediatricians Dismiss Vaccine-Refusing FamiliesDeath From COVID-19 Very Rare for Americans 21 and Under: ReportAre School Lunches a Ticket to Healthy Eating?Are At-Home 'Learning Pods' the Right Fit for Your Family?Kids at 2 Utah Day Cares Easily Spread COVID to FamiliesChildren Use Both Sides of the Brain to Understand LanguagePlaying Football at Young Age Doesn't Slow Concussion Recovery in CollegeYouth Vaping Down, But Still Popular: CDCOver Half a Million U.S. Kids Already Infected With COVID-19Rates of Child Hospitalization Similar Between COVID-19, Flu: StudyKids Can Have Coronavirus And Antibodies at Same Time: StudyKeep School Sports Safe During PandemicCOVID-19 Precautions Extend to Car Seats, Seat BeltsAHA News: How to Keep Kids Active While Learning From Home – and Why That's VitalKids, Teens Usually Have Mild COVID-19 Infections, Rarely Fatal Ones: StudyUSDA Extends Free School Meals Program Amid PandemicTime Spent in Nature Boosts Kids' Well-BeingSweet-Tooth Tendencies Change as Kids Get Older: StudyA Guide to Managing Children's Diabetes During COVID-19U.S. COVID Cases Pass 6 Million, With Infections Rising in YouthsArtificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes in Kids 6 and Up, Clinical Trial ShowsAHA News: As the Coronavirus Upends Schools, Experts Say Don't Forget the ArtsOne Pandemic Silver Lining: Fewer Severe Asthma Attacks in Kids
Links
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

As Schools Reopen, Report Shows 97,000 U.S. Kids Infected With COVID in Late July

HealthDay News
by By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters
Updated: Aug 10th 2020

new article illustration

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- With millions of American children soon returning to school, a new study shows that at least 97,000 kids were infected with COVID-19 during the last two weeks of July.

According to the new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital Association, at least 338,000 U.S. children had tested positive through July 30, The New York Times reported. That means that more than a quarter of those cases had come up positive in the second half of July alone.

Already, some schools have tried to reopen and then had to order quarantines or close after COVID-19 cases were reported among students and staff, the Times reported. North Paulding High School in Georgia, which gained national attention last week after videos of crowded hallways made their way onto social media, announced Sunday it would switch to online instruction for Monday and Tuesday after at least nine coronavirus cases were reported there.

In the new report, states in the South and West accounted for more than 7 of 10 infections. The count could be higher because the report did not include complete data from Texas and parts of New York State outside of New York City.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Alaska, Nevada, Idaho and Montana were among the states with the highest percentage increase of child infections during that period, the report found.

There were differences in how states classified children: Most places cited in the report considered children to be no older than 17 or 19. But in Alabama, the age limit was 24, while it was only 14 in Florida and Utah, the Times reported.

Though public health officials say that most children do not get severe illness, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that a new, more dangerous COVID-19 condition known as Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children has struck children of color far more often than whites. From early March through late July, the CDC received reports of 570 young people -- ranging from infants to age 20 with the condition, the Times reported. Of those, 40 percent were Hispanic or Latino, 33 percent were Black and 13 percent were white. Ten died and nearly two-thirds were admitted to intensive care units, the report found.

New model shows 300,000 dead

Meanwhile, a new model predicted that nearly 300,000 Americans could die of COVID-19 by December if more people don't wear masks or practice better social distancing.

Researchers from the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) have issued a forecast of 295,011 deaths from coronavirus by Dec. 1.

However, if 95 percent of people were to wear a face mask in public, some 66,000 lives could be saved, they added.

"We're seeing a rollercoaster in the United States," institute director Christopher Murray said in a statement. "It appears that people are wearing masks and socially distancing more frequently as infections increase, then after a while as infections drop, people let their guard down and stop taking these measures to protect themselves and others which, of course, leads to more infections. And the potentially deadly cycle starts over again."

His team's model also identifies which states will need to re-impose mask mandates between now and the winter to slow the spread of transmission.

In other pandemic news, the U.S. State Department has lifted its 5-month-old blanket warning against international travel for Americans. Instead, the department will now issue travel recommendations by country.

Why the change? "Health and safety conditions improving in some countries and potentially deteriorating in others" influenced its decision, the state department said in a statement released Thursday. The change will allow travelers to make "informed decisions" based on the situation in specific countries, officials said.

"We continue to recommend U.S. citizens exercise caution when traveling abroad due to the unpredictable nature of the pandemic," the agency's statement said.

Despite the lifting of the travel warning, many other countries are currently restricting American citizens from entry because the United States has far more coronavirus cases than any other nation in the world, the Washington Post reported.

Scientists call for faster tests

To try to better track and stem the spread of coronavirus, scientists have called for widespread adoption of simpler, less accurate tests, as long as they're given often and quickly.

"Even if you miss somebody on Day 1," Omai Garner, director of clinical microbiology in the UCLA Health System, told the Times. "If you test them repeatedly, the argument is, you'll catch them the next time around."

The strategy hinges on having an enormous supply of testing kits. But many experts believe more rapid, frequent testing would spot people who need immediate medical care while also identifying those most likely to spread COVID-19, the Times reported.

Of the dozens of coronavirus tests that have been granted emergency use authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, most rely on complex laboratory procedures, such as PCR, the Times reported.

Only a few tests are quick and simple enough to be run in a doctor's office or urgent care clinic, without the need for lab equipment. And these tests are still relatively scarce nationwide, though government officials say they plan to ramp up production of such tests by the fall, the newspaper said.

"If you had asked me this a couple months ago, I would have said we just need to be doing the PCR tests," Susan Butler-Wu, a clinical microbiologist at the University of Southern California, told the Times. "But we are so far gone in this country. It is a catastrophe. It's kitchen sink time, even if the tests are imperfect."

By Monday, the U.S. coronavirus case count surpassed 5 million as the death toll exceeded 162,400, according to a Times tally.

According to the same tally, the top five states in coronavirus cases as of Monday were: California with over 563,000; Florida with nearly 533,000; Texas with over 508,000; New York with over 425,500; and New Jersey with more than 186,600.

Nations grapple with pandemic

Elsewhere in the world, the situation remains challenging.

Australia logged a record daily death toll on Monday, following weeks of rising case numbers there, the Post reported.

In the Australian state of Victoria, authorities confirmed more than 300 new infections and 19 deaths over the last 24 hours, the Post reported. But there were hopeful signs that the peak of the outbreak might be over. The number of new daily cases in Victoria has been falling significantly since the middle of last week, the newspaper said. A strict lockdown imposed on the state's capital, Melbourne, more than a week ago may start affecting case numbers soon.

Things continue to worsen in India. On Monday, the country passed 2.2 million infections and over 44,300 deaths, a Johns Hopkins tally showed. The surge comes weeks after a national lockdown was lifted, and it's prompted some parts of the country to revert back to stricter social distancing measures.

Brazil is also a hotspot in the coronavirus pandemic, with over 3 million confirmed infections by Monday, according to the Hopkins tally. It has the second-highest number of cases, behind only the United States.

Cases are also spiking wildly in Russia: As of Monday, that country reported the world's fourth-highest number of COVID-19 cases, at over 890,700, the Hopkins tally showed.

Worldwide, the number of reported infections passed 19.8 million on Monday, with over 73,500 deaths, according to the Hopkins tally.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on the new coronavirus.




328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville,
Alabama 36460
Tel: (251)575-4203
Fax:(251)575-9459


powered by centersite dot net