Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
1 in 3 Americans Prescribed Inappropriate DrugsColon Cancer Screening Should Start at Age 45: Task ForceWhat Will It Take for People to Embrace a COVID Vaccine?What Will Convince Americans to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine?CDC Recommends Face Masks in All Public Transportation SettingsInsured Patients Are Getting Surprise Bills After ColonoscopiesBogus 'Cure' Claims Have U.S. Consumers Snapping Up CBD ProductsPediatricians' Group Tackles Racism in Health CareAs Virtual Doctor Visits Spike, Concerns About Equity, Missed Diagnoses GrowWas FDA Lax in Approving Opioids Too Easily?Allowing More Gay Men to Donate Corneas Could Save Sight for Thousands: StudyAccuracy of COVID-19 Antibody Tests Varies Widely, Study FindsCould Drones Delivering Defibrillators Save Lives?Statins Going Generic Saved Medicare BillionsAHA News: Looming Wave of Evictions, Housing Instability Pose Threat to HealthAHA News: Health Apps Pose Privacy Risks, But Experts Offer This AdviceCould You Save a Life After Mass Violence? Most Americans Say NoGun Violence Costs U.S. Health Care System $170 Billion AnnuallyWith COVID Vaccine in Works, 1 in 5 Americans Doesn't Believe in ShotsTelehealth Skyrocketing Among Older AdultsPharmacists in All U.S. States Can Give Kids Childhood ShotsAHA News: COVID-19's Economic Fallout Expands Food Insecurity, as Groups Scramble to HelpCOVID-19 Clinical Trials Lack Diversity, Researchers SayLook Beyond Fossil Fuels to Curb Air PollutionTelemedicine Is Here: Experts Offer Tips for SeniorsMany Older Adults Can't Connect With Telehealth: StudyAHA News: High-Speed Internet Offers Key Connection to Health, But Millions Lack It11 States Could Face ICU Doc Shortages as Coronavirus Cases SurgeWill the Telemedicine Boom Outlast the Pandemic?Yet Another Study Finds Vaccines Are SafeIn Rush to Publish, Most COVID-19 Research Isn't Reliable, Experts SayWith Tighter Handgun Laws, U.S. Would See Fewer Suicides by Young PeoplePandemic Has ER Docs Stressed Out and Weary: SurveyU.S. Air Quality Got Better During Pandemic: StudyColon Cancer Tests by Mail Might Boost ScreeningWill CPR Save Your Life? Study Offers a Surprising AnswerWill COVID Pandemic's Environmental Benefit Last?AHA News: As Pandemic Disrupts Research, Scientists Look for New Ways ForwardAmericans Lag Behind Brits When It Comes to HealthBan Menthol Cigarettes, Lower Smoking Rates?Tech Is Keeping More Americans in Touch With DoctorsEven Small Reductions in Air Pollution Help The HeartHigh Costs Lead Millions of Americans to Shop Abroad for Rx DrugsPandemic Hits Primary Care Practices Hard Across the U.S.: StudyOne-Time Treatment Eases Parkinson's -- in MiceAHA News: Here's What Doctors Know About Immunizations Right Now – You Still Need ThemDoctors' Choice of Anesthesia Could Help Curb Climate ChangeTough State Gun Laws Help Save Lives: StudyBlood Donors Will Get Results of Coronavirus Antibody Test, Red Cross SaysCOVID Got You Scared of Performing CPR? Study Finds Infection Risk Is Low
Links
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Colon Cancer Tests by Mail Might Boost Screening

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Jul 20th 2020

new article illustration

MONDAY, July 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Want to boost colon cancer screening rates? Mail testing kits to patients' homes, a new study says.

Colon cancer is easily diagnosed by routine screening, such as colonoscopies and at-home stool testing.

But despite recommendations that adults get screened from ages 50 to 75, more than 33% of Americans are not up to date with screening.

Ways to increase screening include mailing screening reminders and mailing fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kits, to detect blood in stool.

For the study, researchers mailed 35,000 Medicaid patients aged 52 to 64 who were overdue for colon cancer screening a reminder or a reminder plus a FIT screening kit.

Over a year, the number of colon cancer screenings, including FITs and screening colonoscopies, was greater for the reminder plus FIT kits group (23%) than for the reminders only group (16%), the researchers found.

Mailing screening kits cost only an additional $116 per person screened, which is within the acceptable range of what decision-makers would pay for an additional person screened for colon cancer, the researchers noted.

The report was published online July 20 in the journal Cancer.

"By investing in sending the test kits with the reminder letters, health departments are expected to successfully screen more individuals for colorectal cancer at relatively low incremental costs, and Medicaid organizations are expected to actually save costs per additional person screened," said researcher Dr. Stephanie Wheeler, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

"This analysis provides strong evidence that health departments and payers like Medicaid can substantially improve colorectal cancer screening in low-income and medically underserved populations at a reasonable cost, even given limited budgets, through the implementation of mailed FIT programs," Wheeler said in a journal news release.

More information

For more on colon cancer, see the American Cancer Society.




328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville,
Alabama 36460
Tel: (251)575-4203
Fax:(251)575-9459


powered by centersite dot net