Medications
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
COVID Drug Remdesivir Could Cost Up to $3,120 Per Patient, Maker SaysHigh Costs Lead Millions of Americans to Shop Abroad for Rx DrugsFDA Pulls Emergency Approval of Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19How Ritalin Works in the BrainFDA Pulls Heartburn Drug Zantac From MarketAllergy Med Singulair to Get 'Black Box' Warning Over Psych Side Effects: FDAU.S. Drug Prices Have Risen Three Times Faster Than InflationUse Pot? It Can Interact With Your Meds in Harmful WaysToo Many Antibiotics, Opioids Given to Dental Patients in the ERBrand-Name Rx Rise After Docs Get Drug Company Perks: StudyAs Prices Rise for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Meds, Patients Go WithoutPrice Hikes Have Patients Turning to Craigslist for Insulin, Asthma InhalersAI May Help Guide Patients to Most Effective Antidepressant1 in 4 Gets Unneeded Antibiotics at Children's HospitalsStudy Finds 'No Clear Rationale' for 45% of Antibiotic PrescriptionsAre Antibiotics a Recipe for Obesity in Childhood?Do You Take Warfarin? Time of Day Might Not MatterNew Drugs Getting FDA's Blessing Faster, but Is That a Good Thing?Health Tip: Acetaminophen SafetyTwo More Heartburn Meds Recalled Due to Possible CarcinogenMany Drugstores Misinform on Disposal of Unused MedsHealth Tip: How to Remember to Take Your MedicationsFDA to Allow States to Import Prescription Drugs From Other CountriesOver 40% of Antibiotics Could Be 'Inappropriately' PrescribedFDA Testing Levels of Carcinogen in Diabetes Drug MetforminTaking Several Prescription Drugs May Trigger Serious Side EffectsPenicillin Allergy Less Common Than Thought: StudyMany Older Americans Misuse Antibiotics: PollAntibiotics Not Recommended for Most Toothaches, New Guideline SaysHealth Tip: Taking Anti-Inflammatory DrugsMany Common Meds Could Alter Your MicrobiomeWhen Meds Are Free, Patients Take Them More OftenMaker Halts Distribution of Generic Zantac Due to Possible CarcinogenKids Often Prescribed Drugs 'Off-Label,' Raising ConcernsHeartburn Drug Zantac May Contain Small Amounts of Known Carcinogen, FDA SaysHealth Tip: Take Over-the-Counter Medication WiselyA Prescription for Medicating Your Child SafelyHealth Tip: Taking Dietary SupplementsTrump Administration Announces Plan to Allow Cheaper Drug Imports From CanadaAre Too Many Kids Prescribed Antihistamines?Some Meds and Driving a Dangerous DuoHealth Tip: Giving Medicine Safely to ChildrenHigher Cost of New Cholesterol Drugs Putting Patients at Risk: StudyMany Americans Take Antibiotics Without a PrescriptionHealth Tip: Packing Prescriptions for Travel
Links
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

Are Too Many Kids Prescribed Antihistamines?

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jul 30th 2019

new article illustration

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. doctors are much less likely to recommend cough and cold medicines for young children ever since experts advised against it in 2008, new research shows.

That's the good news. The bad news?

Physicians are still more likely to recommend antihistamines for children under age 12 with colds, despite the fact that they provide little known benefit, the researchers from Rutgers University in New Jersey said.

"Sedating antihistamines such as diphenhydramine [Benadryl] may have a small effect on some cold symptoms in adults," said study lead author Dr. Daniel Horton. He is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

"However, there is little evidence that antihistamines actually help children with colds feel better or recover faster. We do know that these medicines can make kids sleepy and some kids quite hyper," Horton said in a university news release.

Just over a decade ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended against cough and cold medicines for children under age 2 due to safety concerns and uncertain benefits. The American Academy of Pediatrics later advised against cough and cold medicines in children under age 6.

"Families often treat their children's respiratory infections with cough and cold medicines, some of which include opioid ingredients, such as codeine or hydrocodone. However, there is little proof that these medications effectively ease the symptoms in young children," Horton explained.

"Also, many cough and cold medicines have multiple ingredients, which increases the chance of serious accidental overdose when combined with another product," he added.

In the study, the researchers analyzed more than 3 billion visits by children to U.S. clinics and emergency departments from 2002 to 2015. They found that physicians ordered a total of about 95.7 million cough and cold medications, 12% of which contained opioids.

After the FDA's advisory, there was a 56% drop in physician recommendations for non-opioid cough and cold medicines in children under 2 and a 68% decrease in recommendations for opioid-containing medicines in children under 6.

Yet the researchers also found a 25% increase in doctor recommendations for antihistamines to treat respiratory infections in children under 12.

"It is nice to see physicians are heeding the advice to avoid cough and cold medications for children, but switching them to antihistamines is not necessarily an improvement," said study co-author Dr. Brian Strom, chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences.

The study was published July 29 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on cough and cold remedies.




328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville,
Alabama 36460
Tel: (251)575-4203
Fax:(251)575-9459


powered by centersite dot net