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Idalopirdine May Not Improve Cognition in Mild Alzheimer's


HealthDay News
Updated: Jan 9th 2018

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TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The use of idalopirdine does not improve cognition versus placebo over 24 weeks of treatment for patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to research published in the Jan. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Alireza Atri, M.D., Ph.D., from the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, and colleagues conducted three randomized 24-week clinical trials that included 2,525 patients aged 50 years or older with mild-to-moderate AD to examine whether idalopirdine is effective for symptomatic treatment of mild-to-moderate AD.

The researchers found that the mean change in the 11-item cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-Cog) was 0.37, 0.61, and 0.41 for the 60- and 30-mg idalopirdine groups and the placebo group, respectively (adjusted mean difference versus placebo: 0.05 [95 percent confidence interval (CI), −0.88 to 0.98] and 0.33 [95 percent CI, −0.59 to 1.26], respectively), in study 1. In study 2, the mean change in ADAS-Cog total score was 1.01, 0.53, and 0.56 for the 30- and 10-mg groups, and placebo, respectively (adjusted mean difference versus placebo, 0.63 [95 percent CI, −0.38 to 1.65] for the 30-mg group). The mean change in ADAS-Cog total score in study 3 was 0.38 and 0.82 for the 60-mg and placebo groups, respectively (adjusted mean difference, −0.55 [95 percent CI, −1.45 to 0.36]).

"These findings do not support the use of idalopirdine for the treatment of AD," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to medical device and pharmaceutical companies, including H. Lundbeck A/S, which funded the study.

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