328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville, Alabama 36460
(251) 575-4203
     
Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Alzheimer's Cases to Double by 2060: ReportGene Discovery May Help Fight Alzheimer'sCould New 'Brain Training' Program Help Prevent Dementia?Millions Could Miss Out on a Potential Alzheimer's BreakthroughSleep Apnea May Boost Alzheimer's RiskNew Finding Hints at Clue to DementiaResilient Brain Connections May Help Against Alzheimer'sAmerica's Dementia Caregivers Cite Stresses, RewardsHealth Tip: Identifying Vascular DementiaOne Type of Dementia Is Especially CostlyA More Accurate Predictor for Alzheimer's?Failing Sense of Smell Tied to Dementia RiskIs Dementia Declining Among Older Americans?Intracranial Pressure Monitoring No Benefit in Pediatric TBIGender-Specific High-Risk 'Window' Seen in Alzheimer'sWomen at Risk for Alzheimer's Face Critical 10-Year Window, Study SaysDo Fewer Nightly Dreams Mean Higher Dementia Risk in Seniors?Dementia Care: A Huge Financial Burden for U.S. FamiliesPopular Heartburn Drugs Don't Raise Risk of Alzheimer's: StudyFamilies Shoulder Majority of Costs Related to Dementia CareMidlife Vascular Risk Factors Tied to Increased Risk of DementiaMidlife Behaviors May Affect Your Dementia RiskTraveling With Dementia: Tips for Family CaregiversHigher Risk of Dementia Seen in Those Hailing From 'Stroke Belt'Health Tip: Alzheimer's Affects SleepNoninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of DementiaTargeting 9 Risk Factors Could Prevent 1 in 3 Dementia Cases: StudyAAIC: Rx + Training Shows Benefit in Advanced Alzheimer'sAAIC: Alzheimer Biomarkers Up With Sleep Disordered BreathingDozens of Potential Alzheimer's Meds in the PipelineSpecial Training Plus Medication Might Help People With Advanced Alzheimer'sSleep Problems: An Early Warning Sign of Alzheimer's?PPIs Not Found to Raise Risk of Alzheimer's DiseasePopular Heartburn Meds Don't Raise Alzheimer's Risk: StudyLifestyle Changes Might Prevent or Slow DementiaSevere Headaches Plague Vets With Traumatic Brain InjuriesSticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's Again'Making the Best of It': Families Face the Heavy Burden of Alzheimer'sCognitive Decline Linked to Visual Field VariabilityAlzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDCLife Expectancy Slighter Shorter With Parkinson's, DementiaLow Body Mass Index Not Risk Factor for Alzheimer's DiseaseWives, Daughters Shoulder Most of Alzheimer's Care BurdenGene Mutation May Speed Alzheimer's DeclineSilent Seizures May Contribute to Alzheimer's Pathology'Silent' Seizures Tied to Alzheimer's SymptomsPsychiatric Scars of Wartime Brain Injury May Linger for YearsMany Patients With Alzheimer's Disease Discontinue AChEIsAntipsychotic Medication Use Can Be Reduced in Dementia PatientsPast Psychiatric Disorders Do Not Raise Risk of Alzheimer's Disease
Links
Related Topics

Aging & Geriatrics
Memory Problems
Elder Care

Traveling With Dementia: Tips for Family Caregivers

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Aug 3rd 2017

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Traveling with a loved one who has dementia requires special preparation. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has some advice.

"Traveling is a fun and enjoyable way to reenergize your body and mind. It can be beneficial to people living with dementia and their family caregivers under the proper circumstances," said Charles Fuschillo Jr., foundation president and CEO.

"Before going on a trip, there are important steps family caregivers should take to ensure that their loved ones will be safe, comfortable and able to make the journey," he added in a foundation news release.

First you should talk with the person's doctor to find out if travel is recommended or safe. In the early stages of dementia, travel may still be enjoyable. But it can become overwhelming as dementia progresses, the foundation said.

When deciding how and where to travel, make choices that offer the most comfort and least anxiety. It's best to stick with the familiar, and visit known destinations that require minimal changes in daily routines, including sleep and eating schedules.

Inform airlines, hotels and/or tour operators that you are traveling with a person who has memory problems. Brief them on safety concerns and special needs. Make sure your loved one has an ID bracelet or clothing tag with his or her full name and yours. Remember to take important health and legal-related documents with you.

If the person with dementia travels better at a specific time of the day, try to plan accordingly. Take breaks along the way for snacks. Allow extra time for rest between activities, or plan for one activity and keep others in mind if you end up with extra time.

The foundation added that if the person with dementia can't travel, you should consider day trips with enjoyable activities. Another option is a travel theme night. For example, have an Italian-themed night with appropriate food and music, and even an Italian film.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on dementia.




328 W. Claiborne St.
P.O. Box 964
Monroeville,
Alabama 36460
Tel: (251)575-4203
Fax:(251)575-9459


powered by centersite dot net